Your local Yamaha dealer can help you determine if your existing rigging components are compatible with the motor you have decided to repower with. 

Choosing the right propeller is very important. There are different designs, sizes, and shapes to most effectively meet specific performance requirements. There is no one type or style of propeller that is perfect for all boating applications. Yamaha has several resources that can be used to help you choose the correct propeller for your boating requirements.

Performance Bulletins – Yamaha Outboard Performance Bulletins provide in-depth performance information on hundreds of boat packages with the best performing propeller.

The numbers represent the pitch size and the letter is a code that represents the propeller series. The letter code identifies to your dealer what range of outboard motor the propeller is designed to fit. For example- a 17M is a 17″ pitch M series designed for outboard motors from 150~300 HP. Below is a diagram showing where you may find this information; locations can differ from prop to prop. 

No, E15 or E85 should not be run in any Yamaha Outboard.

Cars are having issues but are somewhat more tolerant due to typical usage patterns and differences in their fuel systems. Major differences are:

  • Modern automotive fuel systems (fuel filler, fuel tank, distribution lines and engine components) are closed or non-vented. Once the fuel is pumped into the tank, there is very little circulation of outside air (containing moisture) into the fuel system.
  • Boats are operated and often stored in a very wet environment increasing the risk of water directly entering the fuel system.
  • Boats have vented fuel systems which allow moisture laden air to circulate into the fuel tank as the fuel is drawn out of the tank and as the fuel expands and n wcontracts during heating and cooling cycles of the outside air.
  • Automotive fuel tanks are typically much smaller than boat fuel tanks and are refilled more frequently. A full tank of fuel in a car or truck, typically 20 – 40 gals, may be used and refilled every week or two. Boat fuel tanks, typically 40 – 100+ gals per tank, may only be refilled once a month during the boating season and typically may sit unused for many months during the off season.
  • Some boats use fiberglass fuel tanks. Polyester resins can be dissolved by ethanol.

Cars are having issues but are somewhat more tolerant due to typical usage patterns and differences in their fuel systems. Major differences are:

  • Modern automotive fuel systems (fuel filler, fuel tank, distribution lines and engine components) are closed or non-vented. Once the fuel is pumped into the tank, there is very little circulation of outside air (containing moisture) into the fuel system.
  • Boats are operated and often stored in a very wet environment increasing the risk of water directly entering the fuel system.
  • Boats have vented fuel systems which allow moisture laden air to circulate into the fuel tank as the fuel is drawn out of the tank and as the fuel expands and n wcontracts during heating and cooling cycles of the outside air.
  • Automotive fuel tanks are typically much smaller than boat fuel tanks and are refilled more frequently. A full tank of fuel in a car or truck, typically 20 – 40 gals, may be used and refilled every week or two. Boat fuel tanks, typically 40 – 100+ gals per tank, may only be refilled once a month during the boating season and typically may sit unused for many months during the off season.
  • Some boats use fiberglass fuel tanks. Polyester resins can be dissolved by ethanol.